September 24, 2013

Favorite Structured Language Practice Activities!


Hi everyone,
Recently I was asked for a list of my favorite structured language practice activities.  There are so many that it was hard to choose just a few.  I began to compile a list of these tried and true old favorites and I thought I would share them here with you.  Each Tuesday for a while I will post a couple of fun activities to promote language practices.  Many you will recognize or remember and hopefully you will find one or two to use with your class!  I would love to hear what some of your favorites are!
Happy Teaching!






Socialize, Socialize
1.   Students walk around a predetermined area.
2.   The teacher calls, “Socialize, Socialize!”
3.  Students quickly find a partner and take turns practicing language frame with the taught vocabulary. 
4. After both partners practice, the teacher signal students to walk around again until she calls, “Socialize, Socialize!” again.


Lines of Communication
1.   Students stand in two rows facing each other. Name a line A and a line B.
2.   Students in Line A use the designated prompt to their partner in Line B. Line B students respond with the sentence frame reply.
3.  Once students have responded, the student at the end of Line A moves down the outside of line A and Line A shifts down so new partners are created. (Line B doesn’t move.)




September 17, 2013

Favorite Structured Language Practice Activities!

-->Hi everyone,
Recently I was asked for a list of my favorite structured language practice activities.  There are so many that it was hard to choose just a few.  I began to compile a list of these tried and true old favorites and I thought I would share them here with you.  Each Tuesday for a while I will post a couple of fun activities to promote language practices.  Many you will recognize or remember and hopefully you will find one or two to use with your class!  I would love to hear what some of your favorites are!
Happy Teaching!



Talking Stick
1.   The small group chorally asks the student with the talking stick the language frame question.
2.   The student with the stick or object speaks and the rest of the group listens. After the student creates a response, the rest of the group repeats it.
3.  The stick is passed around a small group until everyone has had a chance to practice the language frame.


Talking Stick Sequence

For functions like Explain Sequence of Events, try this fun language practice.
1.   The small group chorally asks the student with the talking stick the language frame question.
2.   The student with the stick or object speaks and the rest of the group listens. After the student creates a response, the rest of the group repeats it.
3.  The stick is passed to the next student who adds a sentence to an invented story.

For example, the first student with the stick might say, “First we walked to school.” The next student follows with, “Then we studied Math.” The next student continues the story with, “After that, we lined up for recess.” And so on…




September 15, 2013

Hi everyone!

Have you heard of

Online Language Lessons From LanguageNut.com?


 Languagenut engages students through interactive and colorful games, songs and stories bringing learning a new language to life. Used by 1000’s of elementary and home schoolers, Languagenut rewards your children as they collect medals and certificates while having fun. 

Languages You can choose from a wide range of languages including Spanish, English, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Arabic and Japanese. Products – Beginner 1, Beginner 2, Intermediate and Advanced. 

Each package focuses on different topics and gradually builds up children’s understanding in a fun and engaging way. Songs, Stories and Games Languagenut employs the three most effective ways for children to learn a language – songs, stories and games. Children have a great time and learn songs, which remain with them long after they complete the activities. Try the karaoke function and have fun in groups! Compelling stories present the language in a familiar context, read by native speakers. Reinforce the vocabulary through the games area.

Check it out, this might be something you can use in your classroom!

Happy Teaching!


 

 

This post contains my affiliate link.

September 12, 2013

Why the Parts of Speech Give You Infinite Grammar Power

Hi everyone!
Today we have a guest blogger here at Fun To Teach.  One of my favorite blogs is English Grammar Revolution by Elizabeth O’Brien.  She blogs about all things grammar and keeps the wealth of information that she shares at a fun level that is easy to understand.  Drum roll please…she will continiue as a guest blogger on Fun To Teach ESL Blog  today .  This is part 2 of:
Why the Parts of Speech Give You Infinite Grammar Power

 English Grammar Revolution by Elizabeth O’Brien



Now it's time for us to see how knowing the eight parts of speech helps us learn even more complex grammatical concepts. Please, please, please do not get bogged down with the following definitions and examples. I just want you to see how knowing the parts of speech can help you understand each of these more complex topics. 

Phrases are groups of words that lack both a subject and a verb. All of the words in a phrase come together to act as a single part of speech! That means that phrases function as one of those eight parts of speech that we just learned about. Typically, phrases function as nouns, adjectives, verbs, or adverbs. 
            The happy students studied throughout the night. 
            into the night = prepositional phrase functioning as an adverb
Dependent clauses are groups of words that contain both a subject and a verb. They cannot stand alone, and they act as single parts of speech! Dependent clauses function as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs.
            We diagrammed sentences until the cows came home. 
            until the cows came home = dependent clause functioning as adverb
Gerunds are formed from verbs and act as nouns. They end in -ing.
            My mother enjoys baking. 
            baking = gerund functioning as a noun
Participles are formed from verbs and act as adjectives. They end in -ing, -d, -n, or -t.
            The burned marshmallows taste the best! 
            burned = participle functioning as adjective modifying marshmallows
Infinitives are formed from verbs and act as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs. They are formed from the word to + a verb.
            My cat loves to eat. 
            to eat = infinitive functioning as a noun
_________
There you have it! The parts of speech are very important, and having a solid understanding of them will help you understand every other aspect of grammar. 
I hope you enjoyed the lesson! Feel free to stop by www.English-Grammar-Revolution.com for more tips!
  English Grammar Revolution by Elizabeth O’Brien.




September 11, 2013

Why the Parts of Speech Give You Infinite Grammar Power


Hi everyone!
Today and tomorrow there is a guest blogger here at Fun To Teach.  One of my favorite blogs is English Grammar Revolution by Elizabeth O’Brien. 
She blogs about all things grammar and keeps the wealth of information that she shares at a fun level that is easy to understand.  Drum roll please…she will be a guest blogger on Fun To Teach ESL Blog  today and tomorrow .  Don't forget to visit her blog!  Let's get started.

Why the Parts of Speech Give You Infinite Grammar Power

 English Grammar Revolution by Elizabeth O’Brien

Fact: We can organize all of the words that we use into just eight groups based on their form and function. Isn't that amazing? Every single word that we use can be categorized into one of eight groups. The formal name for these eight groups is the parts of speech.

(The eight parts of speech are nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections.)

A solid grasp of the parts of speech is the most basic and beneficial thing that you can know about grammar. Understanding these simple eight categories will give you and your students the tools to understand more abstract concepts like phrases, dependent clauses, infinitives, gerunds, participles, and more. Isn't that crazy? 

The catch is that you have to make sure that you and your students really understand the eight parts of speech before you move on to the higher-level concepts. If you move on too early, everything is a bust. Your students glaze over with a stare made up of half boredom and half hatred. That doesn't help anyone. 

So, don't even think about teaching the more abstract concepts until you've taught the parts of speech.

Let's go over each of these eight categories, and then I'll show you how they connect with those higher-level concepts. 

Keep in mind that this is an overview. There is no way I can show you in a few short paragraphs all of the beneficial things to know about each part of speech. Use this as a guide and an inspiration to learn more! I would also suggest learning these parts of speech with the help of sentence diagrams. Sentence diagrams make everything visual, and that makes it easier for people - especially non-native English speakers - to understand the material.



1. Nouns are words that name people, places, things or ideas. (Mary, kitchen, pencil, freedom




Nouns are naming words. If you can't think of any noun examples as you are teaching nouns, just look around you. Anything that you see, you can name. Those names are nouns. 



Nouns can perform many different jobs in sentences. (Mary walked the dog to the park.)



2. Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. (she, it, they, ourselves)




Since these guys take the place of nouns, they can do anything that nouns can do. That means that pronouns can also perform many different jobs in sentences. 



We use different kinds of pronouns to take the place of different kinds of nouns. 



3. Adjectives describe (or "modify") nouns and pronouns. (yellow dog, furry dog, seven dogs, Joe's dog)




Life would be boring if we had no describing words. Thank goodness for adjectives! They tell us more about nouns and pronouns. They can tell us about color, smell, feel, sound, and other neat things. 



Adjectives answer certain questions called the adjective questions. If a word answers one of these questions, it is an adjective. Which one? (yellow dog) What kind? (furry dog) How many? (seven dogs) Whose? (Joe's dog)



4. Verbs are words that show actions or states of being. (kicked, thought, was, felt)




As you can see from the definition, the two main categories of verbs are action verbs and state-of-being verbs (or "linking verbs"). Action verbs show action (Isn't that crazy?) and state-of-being verbs link the subject with another word that renames the subject or describes the subject. 



Verbs are an essential part of every sentence. If a group of words doesn't have a verb, it can't be a sentence. 



I should also mention that there is a third category of verbs that is less important than the other two that I mentioned. Helping verbs are those little verbs that we use that help shape the meaning of the verb. They are always used with at least one main verb. (I will be happy after the play.)





5. Adverbs describe (or "modify") verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. (very quickly ran, extremely happy)




Adverbs are kind of like the sibling of adjectives. Both modify other words. 



Adverbs answer certain questions called the adverb questions. If something answers one of these questions, it is an adverb. How? (happily read) When? (Read now.) Where? (Read there.) To what extent? (very quickly) 



6. Prepositions show the relationship between a noun and some other word or element in the rest of the sentence. Think of them as noun hooks. (above the trees, into the field, from the doctor)




Prepositions have the worst definition ever, don't they? It sounds so confusing. That's why it's a good idea to teach these with a lot of examples and not worry about the formal definition too much.



Prepositions are ALWAYS in prepositional phrases. A prepositional phrase consists of at least one preposition and a noun or pronoun. That makes sense because they act as noun hooks. They need to be near the noun that they are hooking to the rest of the sentence!  



7. Conjunctions connect two or more words, phrases, or clauses. (red and blue, past the barn or through the field)




If you don't know the song Conjunction Junction, you should check it out. Google it, watch it, show it to your students, and you will all be singing Conjunction Junction all day long. 



Think of conjunctions as connecting words. There are a couple different kinds of conjunctions, but they do the same thing. They link things together. 



8. Interjections show emotion. They are not grammatically related to the rest of the sentence. (wow, yippee, yes) 




These are lonely little parts of speech. They don't interact with any of the other parts of speech. They don't modify anything, they don't link anything, and they aren't an essential part of the sentence. They just do their own thing and that's it. 




If you see how they are diagrammed, it's really clear that interjections are not grammatically related to the rest of the sentence. They sit on a line that floats above all of the other words! Poor little guys. Although, a lot of the time, they express positive emotions, so we shouldn't feel too bad for them.


I hope you enjoyed the lesson! Feel free to stop by www.English-Grammar-Revolution.com for more tips!
  English Grammar Revolution by Elizabeth O’Brien.

September 10, 2013

Favorite Structured Language Practice Activities!


Hi everyone,
Recently I was asked for a list of my favorite structured language practice activities.  There are so many that it was hard to choose just a few.  I began to compile a list of these tried and true old favorites and I thought I would share them here with you.  Each Tuesday for a while I will post a couple of fun activities to promote language practices.  Many you will recognize or remember and hopefully you will find one or two to use with your class!  I would love to hear what some of your favorites are!
Happy Teaching!




Card Games
1.   Players take turns pulling a picture or a word from a vocabulary card deck.
2.   The player uses it in a taught sentence frame that asks a question.  Everyone repeats.
3.  Player then uses card in a taught sentence frame that answers the question.  Everyone repeats.
4.   The player puts the word or picture in the discard pile (or keeps it).
5.   Play moves to next student.

Board Games
1.   Players take turns pulling a picture or a word from a vocabulary card deck.
2.   The player uses it in a taught sentence frame that asks a question.  Everyone repeats.
3.  Player then uses card in a taught sentence frame that answers the question.  Everyone repeats.
4.  Player rolls dice and moves their marker on a game board
5.    The player puts the word or picture in the discard pile (or keeps it).
6.  Play moves to next student.


September 8, 2013

Overview of the Common Core State Standards Initiatives for ELLs





Hi everyone!

I was cruising the internet looking for articles that related to ELD and the Common Core State Standards.  I found this publication from TESOL titled:
Overview of the
Common Core State
Standards Initiatives for ELLs
A TESOL Issue Brief
March 2013
This article includes a brief history of the Common Core movement.  It goes on to cover the development of the Common Core, ELL demographics, CCSS shifts and the expertise teachers will need to teach ELL.  English language proficiency development Standards and the Common Core are discussed, as well as, ELPA 21,the role of ESL and Bilingual teachers, and TESOL’s role in the implementation ot the standards for ELL.


Happy Teaching,


September 3, 2013

Favorite Structured Language Practice Activitie


Hi everyone,
Recently I was asked for a list of my favorite structured language practice activities.  There are so many that it was hard to choose just a few.  I began to compile a list of these tried and true old favorites and I thought I would share them here with you.  Each Tuesday for a while I will post a couple of fun activities to promote language practices.  Many you will recognize or remember and hopefully you will find one or two to use with your class!  I would love to hear what some of your favorites are!
Happy Teaching!
 


Echo Writing
1.   Students work in partners.  Partner A formulates a language pattern using taught grammatical forms and focus vocabulary. 
2.   Partner B repeats the sentence(s).
3.  Both partners write the sentences.
4.  Partner Bs turn to formulate a language pattern using taught grammatical forms and focus vocabulary.
5.   Both partners write the sentences.
6.  Switch partners
7.   Language practice continues until teacher signals to stop.

Appointments!
1.   Students make four “appointments” with different students for each time slot: 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 and record on a paper clock for reference.
2.   Teacher tells students, “Meet with your 3:00 appointment!” Students find the student in their 3:00 time slot and practice taught language forms and patterns.