June 30, 2013

Teaching Cognates


Hi everyone!
Do you wonder about the importance of teaching cognates?  Read on and learn a little more about this important teaching concept.
What are cognates?

Vocabulary/vocabulario, animal/animal, actor/actor,  color/color are just a few of the thousand of English and Spanish cognates.
Cognates are an important part of learning English.  Cognates are words in two languages that have the same or similar meaning, spelling, and pronunciation.  Spanish and English cognates include:  doctor/doctor, family/familia, construction, constuccion, and electricity/electricidad.  Some languages like Spanish have thousands of cognates with English and other languages like Chinese and Arabic have very few. 

Cognates, words in two languages that have the same or similar meanings and spelling increases English language learners vocabularies.

Why teach cognates?
These similarities in meaning and often in spelling give second language learners the ability to figure out new words and learn vocabulary in English more quickly.  These cognates give students an instant foundation of vocabulary. 
When students can identify cognates from their first language it increases student English knowledge of vocabulary by thousands of words they already know. 

English learners need to simply learn the spelling and pronunciation rules that go with the cognate and they have a strong foundation of English vocabulary.

What does the research say?
According to Nagy and Nagy, et al (1988; 1993) many Spanish second language learners need help recognizing and using cognates.  Direct instruction by the teacher helps students use cognates to understand new or unknown words in English.

What are false cognates?
False cognates are words that are spelled or pronounced similarly in two languages, but do not have the same meaning.  Idioma/Idiom in Spanish and English are examples of false cognates.  Idioma in Spanish means language, while idiom in English means a phrase that does not mean what the words say (raining cats and dogs). 
Another important reason to teach English language learners about cognates is to alert them to the false cognates.

What can parents do?
Talk with your children. 
When you see a cognates, words in two languages that have the same or similar meaning, spelling, and pronunciation, point them out to your child and talk about the meaning in your first language.  Remember, Spanish and English cognates include:  doctor/doctor, family/familia, construction, constuccion, and electricity/electricidad.  Cognates are everywhere!

Here is a list of everyday cognates you can use to help teach your child the recognize and use  cognates to build English Vocabulary!  Have Fun!


ENGLISH
SPANISH


A
animal
animal


B
bicycle
bicicleta


C
coyote
crocodile
coyote
cocodrilo


D
dance
dinosaur
danza
dinosaurio


E
elephant
elefante


F
family
flower
familia
flor


G
giraffe
gorilla
jirafa
gorila


H
hippopotamus
hipopótamo


I
insects
insectos


J
jar
jarra


L
lemon
lion
limón
leon


M
music
música


N
necessary
nessesario


P
penguin
police
pinguino
policía


Q
quiet
quieto


R
rock
radio
roca
radio


S
secret
secreto


T
telephone
teléfono


U
use
usar


V
vegetables
vegetales




Happy Teaching!

June 17, 2013

Favorite Structured Language Practice Activities!


Hi everyone,
Recently I was asked for a list of my favorite structured language practice activities.  There are so many that it was hard to choose just a few.  I began to compile a list of these tried and true old favorites and I thought I would share them here with you.  Each Tuesday for a while I will post a couple of fun activities to promote language practices.  Many you will recognize or remember and hopefully you will find one or two to use with your class!  I would love to hear what some of your favorites are!
Happy Teaching!




Describing what is in the Mystery Bag
1.   Player pulls a picture/object randomly out of a bag.
2.   Player views the picture or object privately.
3.  The remaining students use the practice question language form to question the student about their object.
4.  The player responds using the taught describing sentence structures.
5.   Students guess what the player is describing.

Jumbled Sentences/Paragraph
1.   Students work in partners to create a sentence (or paragraph) following a language function and using taught grammatical forms.
2.   The group cuts up sentence(s).
3.  The bags are passed to another group for reconstruction.
4.  Students read the reconstructed sentences to the original group.

June 15, 2013

GLAD resources


Hi everyone!
A colleague from Hillsboro sent in this great glad resource.  It is a link to Everett School District in Washington state.  If you are interested in GLAD strategies and resources, grab a cup of tea, sit back and click on!




Thanks to Laurie Howard for this gem!

http://www.everett.k12.wa.us/GLAD/Links
Happy Teaching!

June 12, 2013

Really Good Stuff Blog Article

Hi everyone!
If you are interested in reading an article I wrote about Smooth and Effective Transitions, click on over to Really Good Stuff.  I am a monthly columnist for them and November's post was all about Transitions!

Smooth and Efficient Transitions


 
by Lori Wolfe, Monthly Columnist
“If only I had more time in a school day…”
Have you ever caught yourself uttering this phrase? You can easily add those instructional minutes to your day by explicitly planning for your transition times. Carefully considered transition times offer the key to maintaining an optimal learning environment, minimizes disruptions and behavior problems while maximizing instructional time. By providing the structure of predictable routines, procedures and behavioral expectations, teachers offer their students, including second language learners and those who struggle with poor attention and impulsivity, an avenue to success during transition times.
Arts include:
Click here to read!

Happy Teaching!